Reviews Review: The Raven Remastered

Review: The Raven Remastered

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Who Done It murders are usually reserved for books, but it’s one of those rare genres that lends itself to whatever platform it appears on. No matter the form it takes, I’m always keen to lose myself in its constant twists and turns, and I love to play the part of the famous detective. The original was released in 2013, and was well received. In 2018 the remastered version The Raven: Remastered swooped in allowing gamers to enjoy a polished version of its gameplay.

Developed by King Art Games and published by THQ Nordic, this point and click, detective game will have you solving the many mysteries that unfold on your journey around the world. I’m going to be very careful as I do not wish to spoil the surprises and twists that you will experience while playing this wonderful Agatha Christie style murder mystery.

A tale well told.

A Who Done It mystery is only as good as its plot, and the characters that it revolves around. Luckily, this one ticks both boxes. A glorious story follows; a legendary detective, a Swiss constable, and a world famous villain. The tale takes twists and turns throughout, allowing you to see the different elements from several viewpoints. This was a fantastic concept as it gave you a fuller picture, and a better understanding of each of the characters’ backgrounds. 

The main protagonist, Swiss officer Zellner, is an avid fan of crime drama, and jumps at the chance to be the lead officer when one unfolds right before his eyes. Detective Legrand thwarts his attempts. He wishes for little to no help and believes he alone can solve the mystery and find the perpetrator. The villain known as the “Raven-heir” is always one step ahead. He mocks the authorities, knowing he won’t be caught.

Zellner loves the life of a detective!

5 years have passed since Legrand shot the “Raven”. The world thought that would be the end of his reign of tyranny. A brutal burglary occurs at the London museum in 1964. A priceless ruby is stolen and a single raven’s feather is left at the scene. Is it someone following in his footsteps, or could he still be alive? Only Zellner and Legrand have the skills to uncover this mystery.

Beautiful landscapes and traditional concepts.

The game flows from place to place with ease; a train (aptly named the Orient Express), a cruise ship, Cairo and an Egyptian museum all await. The detail orientated Zellner must piece together the clues as Legrand focuses on the bigger picture. He sees the smaller issues as futile and cannot see how the dots connect to lead them to their crook. You will talk to the many colourful characters that make up the pieces of this jigsaw puzzle. The conversations are sometimes tedious, long, and feel unnecessary, but they always provide you with information and clues to help you progress.

Talking isn’t the only way to move forward. A point and click detective game is also about inspecting the surrounding area, and utilising the objects you find. This mechanic is used to its fullest as you will experiment with different objects attempting to unlock doors, tricking the characters, and solving problems. This portion of the game is not unlike many others in the genre, and neither stood out, nor disappointed me. The champion element has to be the aforementioned character interactions.

The nervous professor was always on my radar.

Superb delivery, and a delight to look at.

Everything about this game screams classic murder mystery. Zellner with his cliched apparel, and love of drama and murder mystery. The dated and romantic settings for each scene. The brilliant blend of classic characters that combine to create a humorous, touching, and exciting story. You have; an annoying child, a solitary doctor, a nervous and suspicious professor, the handsome and troubled musician, the stubborn famous writer and the member of royalty. Each adds layer upon layer of uncertainty and doubt, and all must be considered a suspect until proven otherwise.

The grainy imagery and dated clothing represent the 60s perfectly. The Raven does a spectacular job of transporting you to this era with its well versed script and accurate scenery. It’s as if King Art Games brought Christie back from the dead and utilised her wonderful vision of the world for us all to explore in this game. 

It’s rare that the voice-over work is delivered to such a high standard. The quality of the acting blew me away. I’d happily sit for hours listening to the well delivered lines from a team of talented performers. If I closed my eyes, I could have been fooled into believing that I was watching a TV series or film. The music is just as good, with the pace and tone changing to represent the emotion of each moment.

Ah, the glory of the steam railway.

He may be chunky, but why must he be so cumbersome.

With such a resounding success from the presentation, there has to be one downside, and that’s the controls. Zellner waddles around like a fat duck next to a lake. His ambling ways were a constant annoyance! You’d crash into furniture, walking around items, and look like you soiled yourself. These were but a few of my highlights. The clunky controls and lethargic UI shows it is best suited to PC. It didn’t break the game, and it was playable. It was simply frustrating.

Solving the mystery is the backbone of this game. But, side stories will distract you. This additional content allows for a considerable amount of replay value. If you want to unveil the cloud of mystery that sounds most of the lesser problems, then you are going to have to be observant, or play it many times.

A remaster that’s worth a revisit.

Remastered titles are big business at the moment, yet they aren’t all worth the effort. The Raven: Remastered is different. A nicely updated look, and quicker loading times make this more accessible than the original. With a fantastic story, excellent acting, great audio, and in keeping imagery, this is a game worth losing yourself in. I recommend you give this a go, and a copy can be purchased here! Can Zellner and Legrand work together to solve the mystery? Buy a copy and become a famous detective.

SUMMARY

Can you help solve the mystery surrounding the "Raven". Travel the world, question the witnesses and come to your own conclusions! A wonderful take on the Who Done It genre. A well written story with many twists and turns await.

+ Excellent graphics.
+ Superb acting.
+ A well written story.
+ Lots of replay value.
+ Interesting twists.
- Some plot holes.
- Some conversations are too long.

(Reviewed on the Xbox Series X. Also available on PC, Mac, Linux, Nintendo Switch and PlayStation.)
Daniel Waite
Former editor and reviewer for www.bonusstage.co.uk, I've now found a new home to write my reviews, and get my opinion out to the masses. Still the lead admin for Xboxseriesfans on Facebook and Instagram. I love the gaming world, and writing about it. I can be contacted at [email protected] for gaming reviews.

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