GamingReview: Monster Hunter Generations Ultimate

Review: Monster Hunter Generations Ultimate

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Capcom must be pleased with what it has accomplished with the Monster Hunter franchise in recent years. It went from being really popular in Japan to a worldwide hit with players all over the world eagerly awaiting the release of the latest title. With the success of the Nintendo Switch, it’s no wonder that Capcom decided to port the popular Monster Hunter Generations to it under the slightly longer Monster Hunter Generations Ultimate title.

Those that have played a Monster Hunter game before will no doubt be very familiar with the manner that they are played by now. The idea is simple and yet so effective due to how Capcom has slightly refined the formula with each new iteration to make it even better. In this one players take on the role of a hunter who comes in to help out four villages defeat monsters (including the big bad) that are ruining their way of life or to merely collect items requested by characters.

The beauty in each Monster Hunter game is how it goes about prodding players to not just follow instructions and to really try to go on their own unique journey. Each game basically gives players a bunch of basic tools and then it’s up to them to make the best use out of them to overcome many challenges and find out their own play style. Despite being one of the more welcoming titles, Monster Hunter Generations Ultimate still attempts to challenge players at every turn and this port sees the return of the tough G rank quests. As with other items players can carve parts from defeated monsters and these can be used, along with other items that can be picked up, to then create fancy new weapons and armour. Rather than level up characters will gradually get stronger and be able to take on tougher monsters by using the very flesh and bone from previously defeated monsters to create the tools needed to tackle the many challenges ahead.

All of this takes place within the ranking ecosystem that is present in every game. In this title it’s all laid out in a manner that makes it very easy to understand. There are missions that can be tackled in single-player or as a group of hunter online and in local play. Although items gathered whilst doing multi-player quests can be taken back to single-player, the ranks and number of completed quests are kept separate.

What this means is that players are not robbed of the satisfaction that comes from completing some of the very challenging quests available in higher ranks in the single-player mode. However, being able to use items obtained by defeating tougher enemies that some players have perhaps not yet faced as a multi-player group, means that those that are not so skilled can then forge better armour and weapons and have a better chance of ranking up in single-player mode.

Not that players are completely alone in single-player mode since they can hire a trusty side-kick Palico feline to help out. These feisty creatures provide support and companionship without making it seem like they are doing all the hard work

Unlike other games, there are no health bars for the monsters in Monster Hunter titles. Instead, players have to rely on visual cues to know how to react when going up against the many ferocious predators included in Monster Hunter Generations Ultimate. Each of these monsters has its own quirks and weak points that makes it enjoyable to battle against it. As a lone hunter this makes it thrilling to hunt them by using various tools like a tracking bomb. As a team of hunters online it shows just how easy it is to effectively work as a team to take down these massive beasts.Monsters will start to behave erratically when critically injured and actively try to limp away from battle. Being able to take part in such thrilling battles without the need for such features as quick time events makes it even better.

Not that Monster Hunter Generations Ultimate is all about the thrill of the hunt. There are also fetch quests to contend with that are not as exciting, but at least it’s not essential to complete them to rank up and get more monsters to battle with. Attentive hunters will notice clues regarding which quests will give them access to an urgent quest that will result in ranking up after completing it.

The attention to detail in this game is remarkable and those that take the time to learn and put in the effort will always be rewarded. It’s possible to get by without making use of all features, such as the ability to switch hunter styles, but it’s definitely worth trying them at least once. It also might prove beneficial to make use of every ability as a newcomer since ones called Hunter Arts will definitely come in handy at various points if they are used effectively.

There is certainly a lot to do and see in the title and it’s enjoyable to explore the unique hub that each town/location provides. It also benefits from making use of the Nintendo Switch hardware when compared to its Nintendo 3DS version. It looks just as detailed on a TV screen with its colourful environments as it does on the Nintendo Switch screen. Being able to play an immersive title such as this on the big screen and exploring each of the many varied locations the hunting takes place in is a joy.

It’s not just the visuals that got an upgrade in this port. It’s necessary to load between various sections within each of the hunting locations and this transition feels smoother compared to the Nintendo 3DS version. There is no sign of slowdown/lag when playing both single-player and multi-player modes. In fact, the quality of the robust online mode could easily make it worth paying to play online on a Nintendo Switch once it is necessary to do so.

The versatile nature of the various control schemes provided by the Nintendo Switch also means that it’s a lot easier to quickly make use of various abilities in combat.

As one of the most accessible Monster Hunter titles to date, it’s easy to see why Capcom would want to make it available for Nintendo Switch owners. What’s even better is that those who previously played the Nintendo 3DS version can also transfer their character with some of his/her data to continue the hunt or just clock in a few more couple of hours. Monster Hunter Generations Ultimate proves that there is still plenty of life in the franchise and that Capcom is definitely getting better at catering for the hardcore fans in a title that will no doubt also appeal to newcomers.

SUMMARY

+ Ability to challenge die hard fans whilst still making it accessible to newcomers or those are not quite as skilled.
+ Impressive selection of monsters to go up against with their own quirks.
+ Plenty of content to see and explore and lots of weapons/armour just waiting to be forged.
- Fetch quests can feel like a chore, but at least it's not mandatory to do most of them.

(Reviewed on and exclusive to Nintendo Switch)

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+ Ability to challenge die hard fans whilst still making it accessible to newcomers or those are not quite as skilled. </br> + Impressive selection of monsters to go up against with their own quirks. </br> + Plenty of content to see and explore and lots of weapons/armour just waiting to be forged. </br> - Fetch quests can feel like a chore, but at least it's not mandatory to do most of them. </br> </br> (Reviewed on and exclusive to Nintendo Switch)Review: Monster Hunter Generations Ultimate