Huawei has delved into the nation’s battery behaviour in a European study, to uncover Brits’ quirky behaviour when it comes to their smartphone battery. The report of over 2,000 people revealed that Brits fall into three distinct personalities when it comes to their smartphone battery behaviour

– SurvivorsBoosters and Borrowers.

  • 41% of Brits are ‘Boosters’, carrying around chargers wherever they are and plugging in anywhere; at the pub, at a café, or even in the street.
    • Boosters are fearful of dropping below 50% battery, with 42% even plugging in when their battery is over half full
    • If in danger of running out of battery while out, Boosters are more likely to buy a mobile charging pack (27%) than hug a stranger (11%) or buy someone a coffee (13%) to get some much-needed charge
    • Boosters are most likely to charge more than once a day, with 1 in 5 battery fiends charging up 4 times or more
  • 39% of Brits are confessed ‘Survivors’, making their battery last for ages, by closing apps and keeping their phone on airplane mode.
    • Survivors are most likely to charge their phone just once a day (54%) and nearly a third (32%) wait to charge their phone until the battery drops below 25%
    • When it comes to being caught short of battery, their survival instinct kicks in and 72% of them say they’d be ok without charge for a bit, rather than hugging a stranger (4%) or buying someone a coffee (4%) to get some juice
    • If caught with just 5% battery left on their smartphone, sensible Survivors would be most likely to put their smartphone in battery saving mode (55%), and 43% would turn off Wi-Fi and shut down power hungry apps, over Whatsapping a friend (10%) or taking a selfie (1%)
  • Just 1 in 5 Brits (20%) are ‘Borrowers’, always asking to borrow their friend’s or colleague’s chargers because they forgot to charge up that morning.
    • Borrowers are most likely to charge at least three times a day (42%), whenever they can steal a charger from an unsuspecting colleague!
    • Staying true to their nature, 21% of Borrowers would ask to borrow someone’s phone if they were caught without charge – while 14% would pay £20 for a boost and a reckless 13% would do ‘almost anything’ for a top up
    • When faced with just 5% battery, carefree Borrowers are more likely than any other group to send a WhatsApp (23%), scroll through social media (16%), check the weather (14%) or post a selfie (9%) – because they’ll soon find someone to lend them a charger

“We are committed to identifying and alleviating the common frustrations that people experience with technology” says Andrew Garrihy, Huawei Western Europe Chief Marketing Officer. “Smartphone battery life is a clear pain point amongst consumers, with many carrying around chargers to ensure they don’t run low. The Huawei P20 Pro has a battery life that will never limit users, thanks to Artificial Intelligence (AI) driven power management for maximum efficiency, and we constantly strive to improve the battery performance of our smartphones.”

Living life with 5 or 10% has become normal for most with over half of British smartphone users (67%) estimating that their current smartphone battery lasts for less than 24 hours (with heavy use), perhaps showing why so many Brits fall into the ‘Boosters’ category. A further 1 in 5 state that their battery lasts less than 10 hours, although the majority (59%) wish they had a smartphone that could last for at least 24 hours continual use.

The Huawei P20 Pro features a 4,000 mAh battery and supports Huawei SuperCharge technology for fast charging, as well as intelligent power management. A 10-minute charge powers the battery to 20%, while a 30-minute charge powers the battery to 58%. Huawei SuperCharge technology is safety certified by TÜV Rheinland completing rigorous tests set forth by world-renowned safety experts.

The Huawei P20 Pro supports 17 hours of video playback, 22 hours of 3G calling, 13 hours of web browsing and 89 hours of music playback; the HUAWEI P20 supports 16 hours of video playback, 19 hours of 3G calling, 16 hours of web browsing and 75 hours of music playback.