Once it checks with ElephantDrive and determines the availability of the account that you want to use, you’ll get the above status message. Click OK and then Apply. It connects with ElephantDrive and reports the status of Logged In.

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To see your account and backup details, log into your account at https://vault.elephantdrive.com/account/login.aspx and use the email and password that you used to set up the account from the NAS.  I went to see my account detail and it confirmed that I had a 50GB promotional account active.  Next, click on Backup/Restore and then Manage Backups.
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Now you are looking at the list of jobs created by TurboNAS when your account was created.
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Highlight Multimedia and Edit Backup.
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Note that the backup job is not active.  I’d prefer that TurboNAS make this backup job active when creating it, but Ii do understand that some may not agree with my preference.  I’ll click on Automatic/Enabled to turn it on.

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ElephantDrive allows you to specify file types to include and exclude from the directory indicated, and also allows some control over versioning, archiving and scheduling, as you can see from these screenshots.

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Currently, my multimedia files are set for continuous backup, and deleted files are never removed from ElephantDrive.  I’d want to review those settings going forward if this was a permanent part of my technical infrastructure.

Conclusion

Overall, TurboNAS makes it very easy to configure cloud backup services and offers two good options in Amazon S3 and ElephantDrive.  As always with these services, costs can add up fast, so I’d use these services to protect the truly irreplaceable photos and home videos and anything else that you would not want to lose in a fire.  QNAP has hit the nail on the head as far as easy configuration of robust cloud backup services.

QNAP TurboNAS 3.5 Deep Dive Part One: ISCSI QNAP TurboNAS 3.5 Deep Dive Part Two: Users QNAP TurboNAS 3.5 Deep Dive Part Three: Volume Management